SS: only three months after the Boxing Day 9.0 Mega-Quake another 8.7 Mega-Quake struck next to super-volcano toba .. this one caused new islands to rise up from the sea .. as can be noted once again the Andaman Islands volcano erupted just like during the previous Boxing Day Mega-quake .. the magma plume was pushing upwards from the deep earth just as described in the mantle plume theory . some scientist might call this an aftershock but if this were a normal volcano with earthquakes on the flanks like this we would call it something else of a volcanic nature as magma movement . we can see in the second map above how close the 2004 Boxing Day Mega-Quake and this 2005 Mega-Quake are located to Toba super-volcano which is the entire 100km long lake caldera .

SS: this is a super-volcano .. i think science does not have the knowledge of the earth’s core and super-volcanoes .. i think that a super-volcano must be viewed at a larger scale such as a planetary scale .. if we view it from this planetary scale viewpoint and that science does not possess sufficient knowledge yet of these objects then i think we need to consider that we do not know for sure the time-frame of an imminent eruption .. with massive mega-quakes on its flank we have to consider that toba is an awakening super-volcano .

Earthquake Pushes Up Cluster of 10 New Islands Near Sumatra May 29, 2005 The March earthquake that struck near Nias island off Sumatra was so powerful that it created about 10 new islands, Japan´s Geographical Survey Institute said. Researchers, led by Mikio Tobita, spotted the new islets on images taken by the European Space Agency´s Envisat satellite, GSI officials said earlier this month. The March 28 temblor had a magnitude of 8.7, but unlike the Dec. 26 quake off Sumatra, it did not trigger killer tsunami. GSI researchers said they compared images taken in February with those from April. They found the seabed near the northwestern coast of Nias island upheaved about 2 meters due to crustal movements caused by the quake. This created about 10 new islands ranging in length from 100 meters to 1.5 kilometers, they said. The quake also pushed the northwestern coastline out to sea by up to 1 km, they said.(IHT/Asahi: May 28,2005)

An aerial shot shows smoke and lava coming out from India’s only active volcano on Barren Island, 135 km (84 miles) northeast of the large and populated tsunami-hit Andaman and Nicobar ‘s main town, Port Blair, May 31, 2005. A volcano on a tiny uninhabited island in India’s tsunami-hit Andaman and Nicobar archipelago has started. Picture taken May 31, 2005. (Reuters – Handout)

Lake Toba (Indonesian: Danau Toba) is a lake and supervolcano. The lake is 100 kilometres long and 30 kilometres wide, and 505 metres (1,666 ft) at its deepest point. Located in the middle of the northern part of the Indonesian island of Sumatra with a surface elevation of about 900 metres (2,953 ft), the lake stretches from 2.88°N 98.52°E to 2.35°N 99.1°E. It is the largest lake in Indonesia and the largest volcanic lake in the world.[1]

Large Igneous Provinces and the Mantle Plume Hypothesis Mantle plumes are columns of hot, solid material that originate deep in the mantle, probably at the core–mantle boundary. Laboratory and numerical models replicating conditions appropriate to the mantle show that mantle plumes have a regular and predictable shape that allows a number of testable predictions to be made. New mantle plumes are predicted to consist of a large head, 1000 km in diameter, followed by a narrower tail. Initial eruption of basalt from a plume head should be preceded by ~1000 m of domal uplift. High-temperature magmas are expected to dominate the first eruptive products of a new plume and should be concentrated near the centre of the volcanic province. All of these predictions are confirmed by observations.

Photograph of a laboratory model of a starting thermal plume (A) mid-way through its ascent and (B) after the head flattens at the top of its ascent. The dark fluid represents hot material from the plume source and the lighter fluid is cooler entrained material. White arrows show motion within the plume and black arrows the direction of motion in the boundary layer adjacent to the plume; the boundary layer has been heated by conduction so that its density is approximately the same as that of the plume (after Griffiths and Campbell 1990).


A researcher examines exposed coral in Indonesia’s Simeulue Island in South-west Aceh in this March 19, 2007 photo. The coral was exposed after a strong earthquake struck Indonesia’s Sumatra island two years ago. The quake caused one of the biggest coral die-offs ever documented, although scientists said some sites were now recovering. REUTERS/Wildlife Conservation Society/Handout (INDONESIA).

In this photo taken in March,  2007 and released by Wildlife Conservation Society, uplifted stands of heliopora on the island of Simeuleu are seen  behind Wildlife Conservation Society marine biologist Yudi Herdiana who is peparing to study underwater coral. A 2005 earthquake off the coast of Indonesia pushed an islands 1.2 meters (3.9 feet) out of the water,  causing one of the biggest cases of coral deaths recorded, scientists said Friday, April 13, 2007. (AP Photo/Wildlife Conservation Society, HO)

Dr Stuart Cambell (R) and Dr Andrew Baird from the Wildlife Conservation Society examine exposed coral after a strong earthquake struck Indonesia’s Sumatra island two years ago, in Indonesia’s Simeulue Island in South-west Aceh in this March 19, 2007 photo. The quake caused one of the biggest coral die-offs ever documented, although scientists said some sites were now recovering. REUTERS/Wildlife Conservation Society/Handout (INDONESIA).

Dr Stuart Cambell from the Wildlife Conservation Society examines exposed coral in Indonesia’s Simeulue Island in South-west Aceh in this March 19, 2007 photo. The coral was exposed after a strong earthquake struck Indonesia’s Sumatra island two years ago. The quake caused one of the biggest coral die-offs ever documented, although scientists said some sites were now recovering. REUTERS/Wildlife Conservation Society/Handout (INDONESIA)

Coral exposed after a strong earthquake struck Indonesia’s Sumatra island two years ago is seen in Indonesia’s Simeulue Island in South-west Aceh in this March 19, 2007 photo. The quake caused one of the biggest coral die-offs ever documented, although scientists said some sites were now recovering. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Handout/Reuters)

Coral exposed after a strong earthquake struck Indonesia’s Sumatra island two years ago is seen in Indonesia’s Simeulue Island in South-west Aceh in this March 19, 2007 photo. The quake caused one of the biggest coral die-offs ever documented, although scientists said some sites were now recovering. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Handout/Reuters)